“Colour Palettization as Archaeogaming Method” #PATC Companion Post

Friday (April 28th) is (finally!) the Public Archaeology Twitter Conference, and I’ll be presenting a paper originally written for Dr. Katie Biittner’s (of “AnthropologyAs“) Fall 2016 course ANTH 321: Archaeology of Gender entitled “Colour Palettization as Archaeogaming Method” at 22:45BST/15:45MDT! The Public Archaeology Twitter Conference (#PATC on Twitter) was graciously organized by Lorna Richardson, and my thanks go out to her for all her organizational and administrative efforts thus far. As someone who lives with chronic illness the concept of conferences is quite fraught for me, and having this entire conference take place online takes a lot of stress off my shoulders!

Now for some ~personal~ writing meta: early on in ANTH 321 Dr. Biittner allowed for a ~research essay workshopping class~ (something which I personally find super helpful!), and in considering All The Ways gender is experienced and expressed my thoughts drifted to All The Ways gender is experienced and expressed in [specifically video] games. Having been introduced to Tara Copplestone’sGamingarchaeo” and Andrew Reinhardt’sArchaeogaming” over Summer 2016 I pitched [a lot, but it boiled down to]: “Is it possible to use colour seriation (inspired by the Lego colour seriation found at “67 Years of Lego Sets“) to track one or more aspects of gendered expressions in video games through time?”

DSCN0331
Overlay for the Magnavox Odyssey game “Simon Says” (1972)–the Odyssey overlays are a fun early example of colour being “added” to video games. [http://bit.ly/2q80aaH]
Obviously that’s a super dang ambitious question to answer, and for the sake of not burning out of the semester the questions I ended up trying to answer were: “Is palettization of video game material possible? And if possible, is it accessible? And if accessible, what are maybe some of the implications of that?” Still ambitious, but absolutely more reasonable than “I wanna use colour theory to seriate smth like Final Fantasy to see if and/or how the series is Gendered” for a four-month undergrad course.

My greatest thanks go out to Dr. Biittner for her continued support and mentorship. (Read as: “Thanks to her for being both an amazing academic and a geek, and subsequently supporting me in my proto-academic geekery.”) I’d also like to extend thanks to my Mum and Dad for putting SNES controllers in mine and my brother’s hands as kids, thus sparking our lifelong love for video games.

As “Colour Palettization as Archaeogaming Method” is currently in review with the Macewan University Student eJournal (MUSe) I’m unable to publish the full paper here, however please see below for a list of presentation figures and project bibliography:


Figures

archaeomap

Figure 1. A diagram demonstrating several archaeogaming sub-fields, or sub-topics. Diagram from Reinhard, Andrew, 2015, Retrieved from https://archaeogaming.com/2015/12/18/archaeogaming-map-revised/. Reprinted under fair use.

chain

Figure 2. A diagram demonstrating the operational sequence of a lithic tool. Diagram from Grace, Roger, 2014, Retrieved from http://rogergrace.macmate.me/SARC/study/chaineoperatoire.html. Copyright 2014 by Roger Grace. Reprinted under fair use.

tentative circumplex model

Figure 3. A diagram demonstrating a tentative circumplex model for emotions induction in video games and virtual environments. Diagram from Geslin, Erik, Jégou, Laurent, and Beaudoin, Danny, 2015, Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5182768. Copyright 2016 by Erik Geslin et al. Reprinted under fair use.

Super-princess-peach

Figure 4. Cover of “Super Princess Peach” for the Nintendo DS. Cover image added to the Mario Wikia by user Conker’s Bad Fur Day, 2011, Retrieved from http://mario.wikia.com/wiki/Super_Princess_Peach. Copyright Nintendo. Reprinted under fair use.

peach 2

Figure 5. Gameplay still of the bottom screen from the Nintendo DS game “Super Princess Peach.” Next to the image still is the colour palette output from http://www.degraeve.com/color-palette/. Retrieved from http://www.vgmuseum.com/end/nds/a/suppeach.htm. Copyright Nintendo. Adapted under fair use.

peach 1

Figure 6. Gameplay still of the top and bottom screens from the Nintendo DS game “Super Princess Peach.” Next to the image still is the colour palette output from http://www.degraeve.com/color-palette/. Retrieved from http://www.vgmuseum.com/end/nds/a/suppeach.htm. Copyright Nintendo. Adapted under fair use.

Figures 7a, 7b, 7c, and 7d. Animated gameplay gifs (top and bottom screens) showing Peach’s “vibe powers” from the Nintendo DS game “Super Princess Peach.” Retrieved from http://animatedscreenshots.tumblr.com/post/23564651381/super-princess-peach. Copyright Nintendo. Reprinted under fair use.

Figure 7a. Top screen shows Peach spinning in a whirlwind; bottom screen shows an activated “Joy” (Yellow Heart) vibe power screen.

Figure 7b. Top screen shows Peach crouched over, in a large haze of fire; bottom screen shows an activated “Rage” (Red Heart) vibe power screen.

Figure 7c. Top screen shows Peach with head thrown back while crying 2 large, cartoony tears; bottom screen shows an activated “Gloom” (Blue Heart) vibe power screen.

Figure 7d. Top screen shows Peach spinning Perry the Parasol while surrounded by a small, slightly yellow, “powered up” aura; bottom screen shows an activated “Calm” (Green Heart) vibe power screen.

suppeach-1

Figure 8. Gameplay still of the top and bottom screens from the Nintendo DS game “Super Princess Peach.” Top screen shows Peach fighting Bowser and Bomb-Ombs; bottom screen shows resting vibe power screen. Retrieved from http://www.vgmuseum.com/end/nds/a/suppeach.htm. Copyright Nintendo. Reprinted under fair use.

suppeach-34

Figure 8. Gameplay still of the top and bottom screens from the Nintendo DS game “Super Princess Peach.” Top and bottom screens blend together to create a single image of Peach in a night sky holding Perry the Parasol above her head. Caption on top screen reads: “THE END”; caption on bottom screen reads: “All Rights, including the copyrights of Game, Scenario, Music and Program, reserved by NINTENDO.” Retrieved from http://www.vgmuseum.com/end/nds/a/suppeach.htm. Copyright Nintendo. Reprinted under fair use.


Bibliography

Bar-Yosef, O., et al. (1992, January 12). The Excavations in Kebara Cave, Mt. Carmel [and Comments and Replies]. Current Anthropology, 33(5), 497-550. Retrieved October 19, 2016, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/2743915

Color Palette Generator. (n.d.). Retrieved October 19, 2016, from http://www.degraeve.com/color-palette/

Conkey, M. W., & Gero, J. M. (1997). Programme to Practice: Gender and Feminism in Archaeology. Annual Review of Anthropology, 26(1), 411-437. Retrieved November 15, 2016, from http://www.jstor.org/stable/2952529

Consalvo, M., & Dutton, N. (2006, December). Game analysis: Developing a methodological toolkit for the qualitative study of games. Game Studies: The International Journal of Computer Game Research, 6(1). Retrieved November 2, 2016, from http://gamestudies.org/0601/articles/consalvo_dutton

De Rochefort, S. (2016, November 4). Rimworld’s system for sexuality is both a work in progress, and fair game for discussion. Retrieved November 4, 2016, from http://www.polygon.com/2016/11/4/13529134/sexuality-in-rimworld

Dill, K., & Thill, K. (2007, December). Video Game Characters and the Socialization of Gender Roles: Young People’s Perceptions Mirror Sexist Media Depictions. Sex Roles, 57(11-12), 851-864. doi:10.1007/s11199-007-9278-1

Geslin, E., Jégou, L., & Beaudoin, D. (2016). How Color Properties Can Be Used to Elicit Emotions in Video Games. International Journal of Computer Games Technology, 1-9. Retrieved November 13, 2016, from http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2016/5182768

Koller, V. (2008, November). ‘Not just a colour’: Pink as a gender and sexuality marker in visual communication. Visual Communication, 7(4), 395-423. doi:10.1177/1470357208096209

Malliet, S. (2007, August). Adapting the Principles of Ludology to the Method of Video Game Content Analysis. Game Studies: The International Journal of Computer Game Research, 7(1). Retrieved November 13, 2016, from http://gamestudies.org/0701/articles/malliet

Nooney, L. (2013, December). A Pedestal, A Table, A Love Letter: Archaeologies of Gender in video game History. Game Studies: The International Journal of Computer Game Research, 13(2). Retrieved November 2, 2016, from http://gamestudies.org/1302/articles/nooney

Reinhard, A. (2016, January 25). Archaeogaming’s Grand Challenges. Retrieved October 12, 2016, from https://archaeogaming.com/2016/01/25/archaeogamings-grand-challenges/

VanDerWerff, T. (2014, October 13). #Gamergate: Here’s why everybody in the video game world is fighting. Retrieved October 30, 2016, from http://www.vox.com/2014/9/6/6111065/gamergate-explained-everybody-fighting

Save

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s